Pushing The Antithesis – Part 2 – Destroying Philosphical Fortresses

beermat_apologetics.012-300x225The second part of the series has to do with taking down philosophical fortresses. Although we have not covered chapter 3 on worldviews you may consider this prep work as a number of principles will nicely lead into the next series.

Try to understand why the unbelieving mind is hostile to the Christian worldview; understand why no one can be neutral and still remain philosophically consistent; what is meant by the “noetic” effects of sin.


The main points to be observed from this chapter are:

  • Factually we must recognize that the unbeliever is not neutral.
  • Morally, we must understand that the believer should not be neutral.
  • Any claim to neturality is a pretense, and it is philosophically impossible.
  • “Noetic” is derived from the Greek word, nous, which means “mind”.
  • This is one aspect of the doctrine of “total depravity”, which declares that the fall reaches deep down into a man’s very being, even to his mind, and his reasoning faculties.
  • The world and the universe do not operate randomly by blind chance or under their own inherent power.
  • In fact, you will even give account for every “idle word” that you speak (Matt 12:36).
  • None of your words is neutral; each one is subject to God’s evaluative judgement.
  • We are not saying unbelievers “know nothing.” We are saying that they do not know anything “truly,” because they do not recognize the most fundamental reality: All facts are God-created facts, not brute facts.

Recommended Reading

Flashing, Sarah J., “The Myth of Secular Neutrality: Unbiased Bioethics?

Kruger, Michael J., “The Sufficiency of Scripture in Apologetics

Oliphant, Scott, “The Noetic Effects of Sin

Woodward, Thomas E., “Staring Down Darwinism: A Book Review